FIGHT SEX AND HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Seeking is Commited to Fighting Sex and Human Trafficking

Seeking is committed to the fight against sex and human trafficking and will block and report to law enforcement any individuals they deem are in violation of anti-trafficking laws. By developing anti-trafficking strategies including ongoing staff training by independent third party organizations, A.I. technology that monitors all profiles and a dedicated 24-hour customer service department, we take every precaution available to keep the Seeking.com community safe, prevent crime, rescue victims, and apprehend criminals

Human trafficking is one of the largest criminal activities in the world. According to the National Human Trafficking Hotline [3], United States law defines human trafficking as “the use of force, fraud, or coercion to compel a person into commercial sex acts or labor or services against his or her will.” According to federal law, any minor under the age of 18 engaging in commercial sex is a victim of sex trafficking, regardless of the presence of force, fraud, or coercion.

Human trafficking can happen to anyone. The crime is not exclusive to any age, race, gender identity, sex, ethnicity, nationality, immigrations status or socioeconomic class. Some, however, are more vulnerable than others. The NHTH’s 2019 Data Report indicates that human trafficking victims are more often women than men, and that minors are at higher risk of becoming victims than adults.

In 2019, there were 11,500 cases of human trafficking reported to the NHTH—but the criminal activity’s reach is far beyond that. The first global data hub on human trafficking, the Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative, reported 108,613 individual cases of human trafficking in 2020—and cases occurred in 164 countries across the world.

If you believe you are a victim of sex or human trafficking or may have information about a potential trafficking situation, please contact the National Human Trafficking Hotline. If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, please call 911.

To report suspected human trafficking to Federal law enforcement, please call (866) 347-2423.

If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, please call 911.

For more information on Seeking.com’s safety practices, visit our Help Center’s resource on safety tips and precautions at seeking.com/safe.

How Trafficking Breaks Down[1]

ACTION

  • Recruits
  • Transports
  • Provides
  • Obtains/Attempts

MEANS

  • Force
  • Fraud
  • Coercion

PURPOSE

  • Commercial Sex Acts
  • Labor Services

Who Are the Victims and Survivors?*

*The data in the infographics displayed was reported in the 2019 Data Report released by the Polaris Project, a nonprofit organization working to combat and prevent sex and human trafficking in North America. [4]

What is Human Trafficking?

WHAT IS HUMAN TRAFFICKING? [5]

Human trafficking involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to
obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act. Every year, millions
of men, women, and children are trafficked worldwide.

GLOBAL DATA HUB ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING [2]

The Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC) is the first global
data hub on human trafficking, with data contributed by organizations
from around the world.

Human Trafficking Resources and Information

There are a number of organizations—local, national and global—that are dedicated to preventing and ultimately ending sex and human trafficking. Some of these organizations provide services and support to victims and survivors, others are advocates in the fight to end human trafficking and can offer more information on this important issue and how you can volunteer in your community.

National Human Trafficking Hotline

(888) 373-7888 SMS: “BEFREE”/233733 (Text “HELP” or “INFO”) humantraffickinghotline.org Hours: 24 hours, 7 days a week Languages: English, Spanish and 200 more

Human Trafficking Organizations

For more information on Seeking.com’s safety practices, visit our Help Center’s resource on safety tips and precautions here:

REFERENCES

1. How Trafficking Breaks Down. (2014). Polaris Project. polarisproject.org.

2. Global Data Hub on Human Trafficking. (2020). Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative. ctdatacollaborative.org.

3. National Human Trafficking Hotline. (n.d.). humantraffickinghotline.org.

4. Polaris Project. (2020). (rep.). 2019 Data Report.

5. What Is Human Trafficking? (n.d.). Blue Campaign—Department of Homeland Security. dhs.gov/blue-campaign/what-human-trafficking.